ELECTRIC VEHICLES

 

HYDROGEN UNIVERSAL FUEL CELL BATTERIES FOR SUSTAINABLE ZERO EMISSION TRANSPORT

 

 

 

Hydrogen powered vehicles can be fast, as seen here with the 999 Ford Fusion at the Bonneville Salt Flats in 2007. A British team is looking to raise the record above 207 mph in 2021 with their Saxon Bullet car, equipped with hydrogen batteries.

 

 

 

Electric vehicles are powered by an electric motor. This does not include hybrids that are also powered by an internal combustion engine, with secondary electric motors.

 

Mostly, electric vehicles were battery powered (BEVs), until solar panels were introduced for the popular Darwin to Adelaide solar challenge. Then fuel cells became a practical alternative to batteries, powered by hydrogen (FCEVs). But the tractive force was still an electric motor coupled to a speed controller, but not including including regenerative braking on most FCEVs, because there is no battery (generally) to accept a charge.

 

Electric vehicles made an appearance in the 1900s, in the 70s and again from 2010. But just recently, OEMs have been making EVs in larger quantities - to comply with clean air rules, requiring zero emissions, to tackle climate change - heralding the demise of diesel and petrol powered buses, cars, vans and trucks.

 

ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE

 

As EVs become more popular, and eventually supplant ICE vehicles, Governments will need to provide large quantities of reliable electricity supplies to be able to cope with demand, and satisfy the needs of the motoring public, those who will be using battery cars and plug-in charging.

 

In particular, electric heavy goods trucks will require more energy than a grid will be able to supply, hence the need for fuel cell vehicles, powered by hydrogen. But, green hydrogen is produced by splitting water using electricity. Hence, hydrogen powered vehicles, or FCEVs, are still linked to the grid in terms of where their energy comes from. 

 

ENERGY INSECURITY

 

Now don't you worry about this, there is a solution. The problem is competing interests and policy makers who may also have investments that generate conflicts. We call that Red Flag politics, after the ridiculous laws where a man was required to run in front of an ICE car, while holding up a red flag, the intention being to frustrate motorists, and keep horse drawn stage coaches competitive artificially.

 

Then again, John Harrison, solved the longitude problem with his marine chronometer, but the academics would not admit it. Even with Captain James Cook endorsing the solution as being indispensable to accurate navigation

 

Sounds impossible, but that is how bad people, and how influenced politicians can be, when leading edge development threatens their stake holdings in outdated technology. Unfortunately, it is the wealthy traders who control the politicians with party contributions, an inbuilt conflict of interest, that only survival of the species might overcome.

 

As to the transition to EVs, most policy makers without conflicts of interest, are sitting on the fence, where they simply do not know how to solve the infrastructure dilemma.

 

It is possible to provide hydrogen gas and renewable energy for electric vehicles - with load levelling - from one Smart Service Station. Let's see if the clever chaps in the Utilities and OEMs, can figure that one out for themselves. Because if they don't own it, they will almost never endorse it.

 

They've only been working on it for the last fifty years, and thirty years ago they rejected the solution in Australia (Energy Commission), the UK (Dti Smart Awards) and USA (CARB).

 

Only now with climate change looming, and cancer awareness growing, are the policy makers likely to grasp reins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The A - Z of ICE CARS and MOTORCYCLES SOON TO BE HISTORIC RELICS

 

 

Abarth

AC

Alfa Romeo

Allard

Alvis

Amphicar

Aprilia

Armstrong Siddeley

Aston Martin

Audi

Austin

Austin Healey

Auto Union

Bedford

Benelli

Bentley

Bertone

Bizzarrini

BMW

Bristol Cars

BSA

Bugatti

Buick

Cadillac

Cagiva

CAT - Caterpillar

Caterham

Chevrolet

Chrysler

Citroen

Daewoo

Daihatsu

Daimler

Datsun

Davrian

De Lorean

Delahaye

DKW

Dodge

Dongfeng

Ducati

Du Pont

Dutton

ECOmove Qbeak

Facel Vega

Farina

Ferrari

Fiat

Ford

General Motors

Gentry

Gilbern

Gilera

Ginetta

Gordon Keeble

Gregoire

Hanomag

Harley Davidson

Heinkel

Highland ZEV

Hillman

Honda

Hummer

Husqvarna

Hyundai

Indian

Iso

Isuzu

Jaguar

Jeep

Jensen

Jösse

Kawasaki

KIA

KTM

Lada

Lagonda

Lamborghini

Lancia

Land Rover

Laverda

Lexus

Leyland

Lincoln

Lotus

Marcos

Maserati

Mazda

Mercedes Benz

MG

MGB

Mini

Mitsubishi

Morgan

Morris

Moto Guzzi

MV Augusta

Napier

Nikola

Nissan

Nelson

Norton

Oldsmobile

Opel

Packard

Pagani

Panhard

Panther

Peerless

Pegaso

Peugeot

Pininfarina

Pontiac

Porsche

Reliant

Renault

Riley

Rolls Royce

Rover For Sale

Royal Enfield

Saab

Sachs

Seat

Skoda

Smart

Standard

Steyr-Puch

Studebaker

Suburu

Sunbeam

Suzuki

Swallow

Tesla

Toyota

Tata

Tatra

Treser

Triumph

TVR

Unipower

Vanden Plas

Vauxhall

Vespa

Volkswagen

VW Camper

VW T2

Volvo

Wolseley

Yamaha

Yugo

 

Please click on the links above to find out about these famous automotive makers, and if they are producing electric versions of their petrol and diesel vehicles.  If your company is not included and you would like to be listed as an EV maker, please let us know.

 

 

 

 

 

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